Workshops and Public Speaking

Contact me (Sara at dismantle mag dot com) if you’d like to discuss workshops or other speaking opportunities.

Click here for more information about Dismantle Workshops.


Workshops

Your Public Voice: an online workshop aimed at scholars and professionals who want to turn their research and expertise into compelling stories for a general audience.

Your Public Voice is co-taught with Dismantle editor and co-founder, Elise Chatelain. We’re currently transforming it into a self-paced online course.

I’ve also done condensed one-day and 2-hour versions for the Feminist Research Institute at UC Davis and the MA in Critical Studies program at Pacific Northwest College of Art.


Public Speaking and Media Appearances

Panel Moderator: Sustainable Solutions: A Candid Conversation Between Female Entrepreneurs. Webinar sponsored by the UN Fashion Pact, World Economic Forum, and Hecho Por Nosotros  (June 2020)

Panelist: Textiles Now: Continuity & Disruption. Part of the Textile Connections Symposium as part of Portland Textile Month October 2019

Radio Interview: “​So long and thanks for all the blisters: A bittersweet eulogy for PayLess​”, CBC News (March 2019)

Guest Speaker: “The Recurring Appeal of Prairie Style,” Textiles and Clothing Dept. UC Davis, (February 2019)

Guest Speaker: “Grease Was the Way Were Feeling” Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Dept., UC Davis (February 2019)

Panelist: Scholar’s Roundtable on Fashion and Labor. Costume Society of America National Conference. Williamsburg, VA (March 2018)

Podcast Guest: Imagine Otherwise: Sara Bernstein on Critical Public Scholarship (March 2018)

Interviewer: “Beauty Talk: a conversation about the meaning of beauty in contemporary culture.” With journalist and author Autumn Whitefield-Madrano, Powell’s Books, Portland, OR (August 2016)

Guest Lecture: “Counter Narratives:​ Brooklyn, Carol,​ and an unfashionable genre’s makeover.” Presentation in conjunction with opening of “The Biggest Little (Fashion) City: Silver Screen Style in Ithaca, 1914-1924.” Cornell University Costume and Textile Collection. (April 2016)

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